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X299 Big Sur Support

Joined
Feb 26, 2011
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126
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ASUS PRIME X299-A II
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i9 10940X
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AMD RX 560 | Nvidia RTX 3070
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Closed loop AIOs are fine, but they don't move water quickly enough so it's not a good solution for overclockers.

Yeah I agree with this, especially with S2066 CPU's they can get very hot.

Having said that, for simplicity I am using an NZXT Kraken X63 and one thing to bear in mind for those using these newer gen AIO's is that the pump speed is controlled by the USB header and so on your hack the pump is running at its minimum speed by default. And this really hurts my load temperatures. (And its louder because the fans increase to compensate).

Unless of course you boot to Windows first, let the control software load then restart in MacOS where it will retain the settings loaded through the USB interface until the power is turned off.

But I've been using this solution and it works really well, I'd recommend to anyone using a USB controlled AIO:

Its simple, easy to use and easy to set up to load at boot.

Screenshot 2021-01-13 at 10.05.36.png
 
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Joined
Jan 29, 2011
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Asus WS X299 Sage 10G
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i9-7980XE
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I really think people need to stop benchmarking their computers. It's cool and all, but what matters is WHAT you're doing with your computer.
I agree. Horses for courses.
 
Joined
Feb 21, 2016
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141
Motherboard
ASRock X299E-ITX/ac
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i7-7820X
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RX 6800 XT
Does anyone know why Intel Power Gadget is not reporting the Power draw accurately on the X299 (temps/frequency etc. seem 0k) IPG works 'out of the box' on the Z390's I have.
I don't really know what prevents it from showing the power draw accurately on your system but it worked for me correctly since a couple of years on X299.
For now i am using OpenCore 0.6.4 without any of the mentioned sensor kexts and Inter Power Gadget reports the data as shown in my screenshot. It did so too in clover without any sensor kexts loaded.
I am using the iMac Pro system definition, if that makes any difference?

Bildschirmfoto 2021-01-13 um 22.55.42.png
 
Joined
Feb 21, 2016
Messages
141
Motherboard
ASRock X299E-ITX/ac
CPU
i7-7820X
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RX 6800 XT
Let's not fight over AIO vs custom loop cooling. :)
As i am using a 240 AIO on a carefully overclocked delidded i7-7820X in a very space constrained Case (NCase M1) im probably in between both camps.

It is nice that we have the possibility to tweak the boundaries in BIOS to not only by letting the cpu go bonkers to it's max possible MHz but also restrain it by defining max power draw and/or temperature.
For my part i found a comfortable everyday balance by capping the sustained power draw to 165W and allowing an all core boost to 4.5GHz.
I chose that ceiling because otherwise the VRM an my board would get very warm and the cpu temp reaches quite some stellar temps on sustained loads. I was not comfortable with that.

These Settings result in roughly 4.3MHz on all cores during sustained loads on all cores which is fine for me.
 
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ASUS SAGE/10G 3301 BIOS with Apple Logo Splash Screen
Released 01/12/2021

Notes from Asus
  • Improve system performance
  • Fix SSD device compatibility


Note: With ASUS BIOS, you can save your BIOS profile on a USB Stick through the BIOS as a .CMO file and then use Bios Flashback, then restore the settings from the .CMO. One thing I noticed is sometimes with this the Above 4G doesn't get enabled so be careful as upon reboot after restoring settings you will get a black screen, and also COM Ports are never restored properly (I always have it disabled on this board). I will try to post a guide for this soon, so it makes it easier for everyone if it's interesting let me know. It's pretty easy.
 

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@Loloflatsix do you recommend doing the "APFS snapshot" removal for Big Sur? Just curious what it accomplishes. Does it come back after an update?

Thanks!
 
Joined
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@Loloflatsix do you recommend doing the "APFS snapshot" removal for Big Sur? Just curious what it accomplishes. Does it come back after an update?

Thanks!

To my knowledge I advise against deleting snapshot :)

This is reported on other threads which may cause an update issue and require you to reinstall macOS for updates.

See here : #34 : I quote :

"A word of caution - The Snap Shot partition/volume was created by Apple to enhance Security and to improve how future updates are delivered and installed. Deleting the Snap Shot prevents future OS X updates, many hack users that went the route of deleting the Snap Shot, found that even though the updates were delivered to their machines, they were offered a full install of 11gbs to 12gbs opposed to the incremental update of 3gbs to 4gbs.
The snag comes about because the update looks for the previously installed Snap Shot, when it is not found, the update stalls or only a full one is offered.

This is a cycle best to avoid as you would have to do this each time if that is your inclination. I wrote about this folly sometime back and I am quite surprise people are still opting to delete. If this next statement makes any sense considering I am talking about a non Apple machine, I try my upmost to have a vanilla install as best and close as possible to Apple's offering, I realise that is not always possible as one may have to do a tweak here and there but if it is avoidable, I leave as intended. Hope this helps someone out there but as the saying goes..... 'Every man to his own'."

But the other interest of snapshot :

Snapshots are more efficient than regular backups. If a single byte changes in a file, the whole of that file has to be copied in the next backup. Snapshots keep only the parts of the file that change, so that the original can be reconstructed. But over time and use of that file, the amount of it which has to be retained to restore its original state inevitably rises up to the limit of the whole file size.

If you have sufficient free disk space to include VM and other large files in backups and snapshots, then you don’t need to change their location or policies.

To maintain better control of backup storage, you should move VMs and other large files to a separate volume, and add the whole volume to the Time Machine exclude list, or disable snapshots on that volume in Carbon Copy Cloner.

You can create snapshots at any time. by making use of terminal app , command line tool.
  1. Launch Terminal,

  2. To create an APFS snapshot, copy and paste the following command into Terminal at the command prompt:
Code:
tmutil snaphot

3. Press Enter or Return on the keyboard.

Terminal responds by saying it has created a local snapshot with a specific date.

The restore begins, and a process bar displays. When the restore is complete, your Mac reboots automatically.

4. You can check to see if there are any snapshots already present with the following command:

INI:
tmutil listlocalsnapshots /

This command displays a list of any snapshots that are already present on the local drive.

How to Roll Back to an APFS Snapshot Point in Time :

Returning your Hack's file system to the state it was in previously using a snapshot requires a few steps that include the use of the Recovery Partition and the Time Machine utility.

Although the Time Machine utility is involved, you do not have to have Time Machine set up or use it for backups, although it is not a bad idea to have an effective backup system in place.

When you have successfully booted into Recovery :
  1. Select Restore From Time Machine Backup and click Continue.

  2. A list of disks connected to your Mac that contain snapshots (and Time Machine backups) is displayed. Select the disk that contains the snapshots — this is usually your hack's startup disk — and click Continue.

  3. Select the snapshot you want to restore from the list of snapshots. They are sorted by date and the macOS version in which they were created. Click Continue.

  4. A drop-down window asks if you really want to restore from the selected snapshot. Click Continue to proceed.
The restore begins, and a process bar displays. When the restore is complete, your Mac reboots automatically.

[NB : You and others can do research to further document this knowledge of which I am not the author but a humble user.]
 
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