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Warning/Report: Booting Clover on a real Mac can be dangerous

Joined
Oct 13, 2010
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msi z77-gd65
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Ok, I faced the same thing on my MacBook Pro 13.
Wanted to reinstall macOS, and by mistake used a clover flash drive, while booting my macbook.
Now, it just keeps chime looping.
Any suggestions?

Tried to detach the screen, but that didn't helped either.
 
Joined
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Ok, I faced the same thing on my MacBook Pro 13.
Wanted to reinstall macOS, and by mistake used a clover flash drive, while booting my macbook.
Now, it just keeps chime looping.
Any suggestions?

Tried to detach the screen, but that didn't helped either.
The only real option now is to buy one of the ‘chips’ mentioned earlier in the thread. They are very easy to install. Mine took about 3 days to arrive after order and takes 10 minutes to install.
 
Joined
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msi z77-gd65
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3570k
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gtx 580
Yeah, but that's not a solution.
a few guys were able to fix it, in this thread, on iMacs.
So there should be a solution for a MacBook too.

Buying a chip, with another serial number, is my last resort...
 
Joined
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msi z77-gd65
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gtx 580
So, no real solution?
Only way to fix this is buying a separate chip?

But wtf... I mean, should Apple Macs brake this easy?
So I literally can brake any Mac with that flash drive...
 
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This thread reads like a giant advertisement for this company that sells PRAM chips for Macs at inflated prices.

There is a solderless option mentioned at the very beginning of this thread, and I am surprised so few of you are going that route and yet will buy a new chip from "some company" for $50 and just leave that on your logic boards indefinitely.

As mentioned, if you somehow read this thread while in the middle of a macOS install, you seem to be able to get out of bricking by turning off the mac before it auto-reboots from the installation process, removing the HDD and deleting some files off the EFI partition that was just created by the installer. Good for the one guy who happened to be reading this or a similar thread during an install with a hackintosh USB installer.

I have been hackintoshing for ~6 years and never heard that I should not use a hackintosh USB installer on a legit mac. I had always kind of figured it wouldn't work, with all the modifications, but I didn't think it would permanently brick a mac. I mean holy ****.

To everyone saying they are idiots for doing this- you are not. How were we supposed to know? Similar 3rd party tools in the past make sure you are on the correct firmware, or at least have a pop up dialog to confirm you are not doing this on incorrect hardware (PS3 jailbreaks for example), and yet nowhere (at least as of a couple of years ago) does anyone say "oh hey by the way don't use this on a real Mac".

I'll probably be going the clip + raspberry pi route as the clip is like $10.
 
Joined
Feb 19, 2018
Messages
490
Motherboard
Gigabyte TRX40 Aorus Xtreme
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Threadripper 3970X
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RX 580
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MacBook, MacBook Pro
Classic Mac
Xserve
Mobile Phone
iOS
This thread reads like a giant advertisement for this company that sells PRAM chips for Macs at inflated prices.

There is a solderless option mentioned at the very beginning of this thread
To fix it, I had to fully disassemble it, remove the Logic Board and access a tiny SOIC8 chip (the chip containing the UEFI firmware) on the BACK of the LB using the POMONA 5250 clip and then dump the corrupted firmware (will explain why), then reprogram the EEPROM with a Raspberry Pi and 8 cables with a dumped original firmware I had downloaded. You cannot download every original dump for every Mac model, every dump came from forum users and I got lucky to even find one for my machine.

Then, I had to open the corrupted dump with a Hex Editor and find the Intel ME region and how long it is, copy it to the new downloaded dump (without a clean or original ME region your Mac will be unbearably slow) and also find the serial number and replace it with my own. Then I had to reprogram the chip with the new, modified ROM.

Also, the chip is so damn tiny the clip could not make proper contact and I had to physically remove plastic from the clip to further expose the contacts and hold it in place by a contraption of lego bricks and elastic bands. I had to try over an hour just to make stable contact.

All in all I spent countless hours researching and waited over a week for the damn clip ($25 btw + $4 for cables) to arrive.
8/10 experience cannot complain but wouldn't recommend.
But as per @random-name's post you have to fully disassemble your Macbook, find a tiny chip, perform surgery to remove excess plastic, find reliable firmware, edit it with a Hex editor, spend countless hours doing all that, buy a Raspberry Pi and cables and know what you are doing.

Far easier and cheaper to buy a new chip and install it, it takes a few minutes.
The chip is about $50 compared to $65 the hard way - $25 for your clip and cables plus $40 for the Pi.

Another poster says about removing the HDD and removing partitions etc - that isn't solderless either if your SSD is soldered onto the LB like most are nowadays.

Why make things difficult when there is an easier, cheaper solution? Unless of course you like doing that sort of thing.

I know which I, and probably the majority, prefer.
 
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