PowerMac G5 Hackintosh with original PSU and cooling

Discussion in 'Completed Mods' started by Gervasio, Oct 4, 2017.

  1. Gervasio

    Gervasio

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2017
    Messages:
    3
    Mobo:
    Supermicro X8SIL-F
    CPU:
    Xeon X3440
    Graphics:
    Radeon R9 280
    Oct 4, 2017 at 3:44 PM #1
    Gervasio

    Gervasio

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2017
    Messages:
    3
    Mobo:
    Supermicro X8SIL-F
    CPU:
    Xeon X3440
    Graphics:
    Radeon R9 280
    Hi there! This is the first post I make in this community, but it's the result of hundreds of hours spent lurking.

    I present to you my PowerMac G5 Hackintosh:

    [​IMG]

    This is the result of months of research, work and frustration.

    The list of parts:

    -Supermicro X8SIL-F Motherboard
    -Intel Xeon X3440 CPU
    -Sapphire AMD Radeon R9 280 3GB Dual-X
    -Bluetooth module from a 24" early 2007 iMac, connected to a USB header on the board
    -Original PSU, heatsink and fans. The fans are wired up to the motherboard, with the speed control line connected to 3.3V on the PSU
    -80GB Western Digital laptop drive (provisional)
    -2GiB Kingston DDR3 1333 (Provisional)
    Here are the guts:

    [​IMG]

    I'm using the original heatsink, fans, CPU covers and PSU. Even the original air baffle.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The back ports are also the originals, sawed off from the factory logic board, which was sadly dead:

    [​IMG]

    Only USB and Ethernet work, though.

    I couldn't have done it without getting the information from the following threads:

    -G5 to ATX PSU conversion:
    https://www.tonymacx86.com/threads/g5-mod-with-intact-case-and-reused-psu.80767/

    -Front panel conversion:
    https://www.tonymacx86.com/threads/power-mac-g5-front-i-o.119105/

    I also have some crude build logs in my Youtube channel, but I'm not sure if that counts as spam.
     
  2. AlphaFox

    AlphaFox

    Joined:
    May 30, 2016
    Messages:
    559
    Mac:
    iMac, MacBook Air
    Classic Mac:
    512K
    Mobile Phone:
    iOS
    Oct 5, 2017 at 12:35 AM #2
    AlphaFox

    AlphaFox

    Joined:
    May 30, 2016
    Messages:
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    Mac:
    iMac, MacBook Air
    Classic Mac:
    512K
    Mobile Phone:
    iOS
    very clean! looks stock, nice!
    are you using that G4 iMac as a monitor?
     
  3. Gervasio

    Gervasio

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2017
    Messages:
    3
    Mobo:
    Supermicro X8SIL-F
    CPU:
    Xeon X3440
    Graphics:
    Radeon R9 280
    Oct 5, 2017 at 11:47 AM #3
    Gervasio

    Gervasio

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2017
    Messages:
    3
    Mobo:
    Supermicro X8SIL-F
    CPU:
    Xeon X3440
    Graphics:
    Radeon R9 280
    Thank you!

    Yup, the 24" iMac (It's a Mid-2007 Core2Duo, or rather used to be) I'm using as a monitor. It's not finished yet, though. I have to put an internal USB hub in it and wire up the ports.
     
  4. yangbao111

    yangbao111

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2016
    Messages:
    36
    Mobo:
    GA-H170N-WIFI
    CPU:
    i7 6700K
    Graphics:
    EVGA GeForce GTX 950 SC
    Mac:
    MacBook Pro, Mac mini
    Mobile Phone:
    iOS
    Oct 12, 2017 at 7:27 PM #4
    yangbao111

    yangbao111

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2016
    Messages:
    36
    Mobo:
    GA-H170N-WIFI
    CPU:
    i7 6700K
    Graphics:
    EVGA GeForce GTX 950 SC
    Mac:
    MacBook Pro, Mac mini
    Mobile Phone:
    iOS
    This is insane. Could you share the details.

    Thanks.
     
  5. Gervasio

    Gervasio

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2017
    Messages:
    3
    Mobo:
    Supermicro X8SIL-F
    CPU:
    Xeon X3440
    Graphics:
    Radeon R9 280
    Oct 13, 2017 at 2:06 PM #5
    Gervasio

    Gervasio

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2017
    Messages:
    3
    Mobo:
    Supermicro X8SIL-F
    CPU:
    Xeon X3440
    Graphics:
    Radeon R9 280
    Sure.
    There's really not much to it, mounting the board was quite the standard affair of hammering the original standoffs off the case and gluing them back into the mATX positions. First I used mirror glue, but it didn't work as expected and I ended up using epoxy.
    IMG_20170922_125520.jpg
    The board fit like a glove.

    Then, I did the PSU, which wasn't that hard, since the voltages are all marked inside, so it was just a tedious splicing job.
    78953cc8-e17b-49f8-a831-9c4dcb7def0c.jpg

    3914667d-5340-4d28-b129-6a828a559c94.jpg

    As a side note, the ATX specification requires a "Power Good" signal to be pulled up from the PSU to indicate the system that all the power regulation is working. The G5 PSU lacks this signal, so I simply tied it to the 5V rail.

    Here's the almost finished PSU, with the PCIe connectors missing:
    a6c6e555-98e0-47ff-abdc-a4210f1a0c71.jpg

    The heatsink wasn't that easy to do. First I marked the holes for the LGA115x mount, and then I ground off the "bump" for the original CPU. I also had to add a metal shim between the CPU and the heatsink.

    05e36b56-247c-441b-bd0f-c2f1f5000eee.jpg

    The holes for LGA115x are 7.5cm apart from each other in a square pattern.

    Then I simply hot-glued the back ports to the motherboard and soldered everything together.

    8ddfd634-7051-4360-b007-8dca57ef2bdc.jpg

    I have some videos about this build in my youtube channel.

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLTRT13hW5dGFpcAHLo2DcrywbUAl8KBmN
     

    Attached Files:

    • IMG_20171004_160704.jpg  (2.1 MB, 3 views)
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 13, 2017 at 2:32 PM

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