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Motherboard doesn't boot Windows disks

Joined
Apr 21, 2011
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Hi all!

I've been successfully running a purchased Hackintosh for the past few years.
Now it's updated to High Sierra and all of a sudden the motherboard (I assume) doesn't want to boot anything Windows related, HDD or USB.

Tried setting the bootdisk priority to the Windows drive, the Windows Boot Manager and even to a USB drive loaded with Windows 10. Nothing works, it just loads the BIOS/Windows splash screen with the loading balls and hangs from there. Forever, tried it for 24 hours. The USB drive results in an error.



They're all formatted to GPT, not MBR. So that shouldn't matter.

The system was previously set up with OS X on one SSD and Windows 10 on another.
If I ever wanted to boot Windows, I would just select it from the BIOS boot selection screen by pressing F12 at boot up.

OS X is running just fine and the Windows 10 SSD even shows up in the drives list. I can open it and everything, but only in OS X.

I assume it has something to do with the motherboard settings?
Below are some pictures of the BIOS settings, to clarify the settings and attempts:

Sandisk = USB drive with Win10 installation
Samsung SSD 850 EVO 500GB = Windows 10
Samsung SSD 850 PRO 1TB = OS X

Tried to boot the Windows disks (USB and SSD) with storage boot option control and Other PCI Device ROM priority as followed with both Windows features to Other OS and Windows 8/10:

Storage Boot - UEFI
Other PCI Device - Legacy

Storage Boot - Legacy
Other PCI Device - UEFI

Storage Boot - UEFI
Other PCI Device - UEFI

Storage Boot - Legacy
Other PCI Device - Legacy

Also tried it with CSM Support disabled.
















System specs:

Motherboard: Gigabyte X99-UD5-WIFI
CPU: Intel Core i7-5930K
RAM: 64GB
GFX: NVIDIA GTX 980
Storage: 1x1TB SSD Mac OS X - 1x500GB Windows 10 - 3x2TB RAID (Mac) - 1x3TB (WIndows)
Clover version: 2.4K rev. 4458

The windows drives work fine in different PC's, so they're not broken.
If anyone has any idea what's going on, please let me know! :)
 
Joined
Jul 24, 2015
Messages
2,287
Motherboard
MSI H81i
CPU
i5-4570
Graphics
RX 580
The system was previously set up with OS X on one SSD and Windows 10 on another.
If I ever wanted to boot Windows, I would just select it from the BIOS boot selection screen by pressing F12 at boot up.
The problem is Windows and its bootloader. You can use 'bcdboot' from Windows installation media - see Microsoft's docs - to reconfigure it.

Although you have many entries/boot options in firmware there doesn't seem to be one for Clover so be aware of that when using bcdboot: use the /s option to specify the EFI partition (its drive letter) that you use for Windows bootloader (unless its the same partition as Clover is installed to, in that case: don't use the /s option)
 
Joined
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Messages
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The problem is Windows and its bootloader. You can use 'bcdboot' from Windows installation media - see Microsoft's docs - to reconfigure it...
Hi Vulgo, thank you for your help and insight!
To break it down, I need to
- Boot the windows disk in another PC
- Run bcdboot
- Repair the boot environment on C (I assume)
- Put the disk back into the other machine
- Run the machine with normal BIOS settings used to run OS X?

Correct?

As for the location of Clover, I don't believe I ever installed Clover on Windows?
Is that done automatically or do I need to run something?

What I did before, when installing Windows before was just unplug all the drives, pop in an empty drive and a USB stick with windows and install. Don't recall anything with Clover.

Again, many thanks for your help :)
 
Joined
Jul 24, 2015
Messages
2,287
Motherboard
MSI H81i
CPU
i5-4570
Graphics
RX 580
Hi Vulgo, thank you for your help and insight!
To break it down, I need to
- Boot the windows disk in another PC
- Run bcdboot
- Repair the boot environment on C (I assume)
- Put the disk back into the other machine
- Run the machine with normal BIOS settings used to run OS X?
I'd try to boot recovery media and run bcdboot on the system you want to configure permanently if possible, its likely the NVRAM data there that needs to be reconfigured.

If you configure from another machine assign the EFI partition a drive letter and use the /s option. And delete the 'Windows Boot Manager' boot options on the machine that won't boot as these are likely the cause of your problems.

As for the location of Clover, I don't believe I ever installed Clover on Windows?
Is that done automatically or do I need to run something?

What I did before, when installing Windows before was just unplug all the drives, pop in an empty drive and a USB stick with windows and install. Don't recall anything with Clover.
If Clover and Windows bootloaders are installed on separate internal EFI partitions you will be able to continue to start them using the /EFI/BOOT/BOOT.EFI fallback path shown in firmware settings as 'UEFI OS: Some disk...' - this is "guaranteed to work" when there are no permanent boot options stored in NVRAM otherwise it may not work that way as it is not supposed to.

The optimal solution for permanently installed bootloaders on internal disks is to create NVRAM boot options pointing to the loaders in the vendor folders. There is a Windows program that can do this called EasyUEFI, i think version 2.7 is a free download if you can find it. For creating the Windows Boot Manager entry you should use bcdboot.
 

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Joined
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I'd try to boot recovery media and run bcdboot on the system you want to configure permanently if possible, its likely the NVRAM data there that needs to be reconfigured.
...
The optimal solution for permanently installed bootloaders on internal disks is to create NVRAM boot options pointing to the loaders in the vendor folders. There is a Windows program that can do this called EasyUEFI, i think version 2.7 is a free download if you can find it. For creating the Windows Boot Manager entry you should use bcdboot.
Would you perhaps know how I could run a recovery usb drive?

The problem is, I can't boot anything except for Mac OS X.
Not even a recovery or an installation usb drive.

So I can't run bcdboot on the system itself at the moment.
Even with all of the other disks disconnected.

Also ran the EasyUEFI on the other system but the bootloaders keep coming back.
I can make a screenshot of it tomorrow, maybe that would help.
 
Joined
Jul 24, 2015
Messages
2,287
Motherboard
MSI H81i
CPU
i5-4570
Graphics
RX 580
The problem is, I can't boot anything except for Mac OS X.
Not even a recovery or an installation usb drive.
You can download a Windows 10 image from here. To make a bootable USB drive in macOS:
  • Initialise the USB drive to MBR/MS-DOS/FAT in Disk Utitlity
  • Mount the ISO
  • Copy contents of the ISO to the USB drive
Is this the type of USB drive you've been unable to boot?
 
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Yes, that's exactly the problem.
Tried it as GPT and MBR.

Made the USB from Windows with Rufus and the media creator tool.
From Mac it was made with Boot Camp Assistent.

It shows up as UEFI in the boot list in the BIOS but when installing it just hangs and sometimes gives an error after a while.

I feel like it's a BIOS setting that needs to be changed.
 
Joined
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Messages
2,287
Motherboard
MSI H81i
CPU
i5-4570
Graphics
RX 580
Tried it as GPT and MBR.
UEFI booting the installer it makes no difference. Windows installation target does make a difference, Windows UEFI installations linked to GPT disks (Microsoft's choice).

From Mac it was made with Boot Camp Assistent.
Boot Camp is for Apple hardware, you shouldn't be using it for anything UEFI. Strange things will happen.

It shows up as UEFI in the boot list in the BIOS but when installing it just hangs and sometimes gives an error after a while.
Where are you installing to and what is the error, there should be a number you can google? Problems with installing Windows may be unrelated to problems with booting a Windows installation.

Or they may be related. Maybe Windows doesn't like the number of EFI partitions, location(s) of Microsoft bootloaders if there are more than one, partition allocations etc. If you can boot the installer, don't start an installation, open a command prompt and use bcdboot to tell Windows where it is installed and see if it can set up the loader. If you have multiple Windows installations attached on separate disks disconnect others leaving only one to make bootable.

If Windows is no longer installed don't install to anything partitioned with Bootcamp, if you're giving Windows a whole disk erase and partition it from within setup.

Tried to boot the Windows disks (USB and SSD) with storage boot option control and Other PCI Device ROM priority
If you only have OS's installed for EFI booting you can leave 'storage boot option' as UEFI only to speed up booting. PCI Device ROM priority isn't going to make any difference unless your hardware isn't working. Windows features can be turned off for maximum compatibility, Windows doesn't need them turned on in order to boot.

I feel like it's a BIOS setting that needs to be changed.
Maybe. Suggest backing up your firmware settings, then reset to optimised defaults - making only the widely recommended changes for booting macOS e.g. WHQL/Windows 8/10 off, fast boot off, vt-d off, xhci handoff on, cpu->cfg lock off - anything recommended for your hardware.
 
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UEFI booting the installer it makes no difference. Windows installation target does make a difference, Windows UEFI installations linked to GPT disks (Microsoft's choice).
...
Maybe. Suggest backing up your firmware settings, then reset to optimised defaults - making only the widely recommended changes for booting macOS e.g. WHQL/Windows 8/10 off, fast boot off, vt-d off, xhci handoff on, cpu->cfg lock off - anything recommended for your hardware.
After a lot of fiddling with bootloaders, BCD, checking disks and reovery media, I decided to just roll back to a different BIOS firmware.
This did the trick.

I rolled back to the original firmware, just to check if it was the firmware or the settings.
Turns out, it's the firmware.

Everything is up and running again.
Thanks again for all your help, Vulgo!
 
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