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How are real Macbook Pro's in video editing?

Joined
Aug 17, 2018
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My Hackintosh desktop build (check my signature below) has been running wonderfully great for our video editing... especially in macOS Mojave, where the AMD card is utilized 100% during playback and export in Adobe Premiere Pro.

We have a YouTube channel, I do computer tutorials, and my hubby does the drone / GoPro travel videos, so we share our dual-boot PC.

Now that the workload is getting a bit more though, it would be nice if he could have this PC in his office, so while he's exporting, he can do his other work done.

Our Windows laptops are totally underpowered for video editing, so I was wondering if you have any experience video editing on a Macbook Pro.

I am thinking of giving my husband the PC, and I get me a used 2015 Macbook Pro i7 (can't afford the new models). My technology tutorials / reviews / unboxing aren't as resource-demanding as a 4K drone footage, but I do need something that doesn't crash on me (or takes 2 days to export, like my i5 laptop).

Thanks in advance for sharing your experiences.
 
Joined
Feb 24, 2018
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Asus Maximus Hero IX
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Create proxies with drone footage or transcode the footage to an editable format, h.264 isn't made for editing and it can put a lot of strain on the system. You can either create proxies on ingest of the media or select the clips in the bin, right click and select create proxies. It will open media encoder and create the lower re proxies, helping your system.

Make sure that you use the toggle proxies tab to enable or disable, as per the screen shot.
 

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Joined
Aug 17, 2018
Messages
141
Motherboard
AsusPro B9440UA-Clover
CPU
i5-7200U
Graphics
HD 620, 1920 x 1080
Mac
Mac mini
Mobile Phone
iOS
Create proxies with drone footage or transcode the footage to an editable format, h.264 isn't made for editing and it can put a lot of strain on the system. You can either create proxies on ingest of the media or select the clips in the bin, right click and select create proxies. It will open media encoder and create the lower re proxies, helping your system.

Make sure that you use the toggle proxies tab to enable or disable, as per the screen shot.
Thank you. I was already aware of using proxies. I will try on the laptop again, but I might end up upgrading to something better, as I am sure even proxies might take ages to encode.

My question is to what should I upgrade? A Macbook Pro or perhaps a Dell XPS? Windows machines are almost half the price of a Macbook Pro for the same specs, but I've noticed from my dual-boot Hackintosh that Premiere Pro seems to run smoother on the macOS than in Windows.
 
Joined
Sep 19, 2010
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Dell T5500 (Tylersburg 5520)
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X5670
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RX 580
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MacBook Air, MacBook Pro
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iOS
I realize that I'm late to the party, but I thought I'd share my (limited) experience editing with Davinci Resolve and iMovie. iMovie is a strange beast. It runs as fast on MacBook Air (dual core i7 @ 2.2Ghz) as my Hackintosh (6 core Xeon @ 2.9 Ghz + Radeon RX 580.) I think this is because Apple extensively leverages Intel Quicksync, a hardware video encoder on Intel integrated GPUs. With an hour long h.264 clip, with relatively sparse transitions and titles, it takes both machines about 45 minutes to transcode from 1080p to 720p. Since my Hackintosh has no Intel GPU, it doesn't get a speed bump to encoding tasks despite having three times as many cores and threads. The Radeon apparently doesn't give at an edge over a lowly MacBook Air. Even with Davinci Resolve, the same clip also takes 45 minutes to encode on my Hackintosh.

With that eye opening revelation, I realized that video editing on a Macbook is quite doable, as long as you stick to Apple products. I'll try encoding on the MacBook Air with Davinci Resolve just for fun, but I'm not sure it can leverage Quicksync as effectively as iMovie.
 
Joined
Feb 24, 2018
Messages
41
Motherboard
Asus Maximus Hero IX
CPU
I7-7700K
Graphics
Vega 64
Mac
iMac
Thank you. I was already aware of using proxies. I will try on the laptop again, but I might end up upgrading to something better, as I am sure even proxies might take ages to encode.

My question is to what should I upgrade? A Macbook Pro or perhaps a Dell XPS? Windows machines are almost half the price of a Macbook Pro for the same specs, but I've noticed from my dual-boot Hackintosh that Premiere Pro seems to run smoother on the macOS than in Windows.
I use a MacBook Pro for field editing, but for anything labour intensive I go to the hackingtosh, as it's much faster in all fronts, playback, editing, transcoding, exporting etc.
 
Joined
Feb 24, 2018
Messages
41
Motherboard
Asus Maximus Hero IX
CPU
I7-7700K
Graphics
Vega 64
Mac
iMac
I realize that I'm late to the party, but I thought I'd share my (limited) experience editing with Davinci Resolve and iMovie. iMovie is a strange beast. It runs as fast on MacBook Air (dual core i7 @ 2.2Ghz) as my Hackintosh (6 core Xeon @ 2.9 Ghz + Radeon RX 580.) I think this is because Apple extensively leverages Intel Quicksync, a hardware video encoder on Intel integrated GPUs. With an hour long h.264 clip, with relatively sparse transitions and titles, it takes both machines about 45 minutes to transcode from 1080p to 720p. Since my Hackintosh has no Intel GPU, it doesn't get a speed bump to encoding tasks despite having three times as many cores and threads. The Radeon apparently doesn't give at an edge over a lowly MacBook Air. Even with Davinci Resolve, the same clip also takes 45 minutes to encode on my Hackintosh.

With that eye opening revelation, I realized that video editing on a Macbook is quite doable, as long as you stick to Apple products. I'll try encoding on the MacBook Air with Davinci Resolve just for fun, but I'm not sure it can leverage Quicksync as effectively as iMovie.
imovie? Possibly the worst thing to use ever!
 
Joined
Sep 19, 2010
Messages
85
Motherboard
Dell T5500 (Tylersburg 5520)
CPU
X5670
Graphics
RX 580
Mac
MacBook Air, MacBook Pro
Mobile Phone
iOS
I know iMovie is for noobs, but that indeed is what I am. I was primarily commenting on export times, not features.

I tried out DaVinci Resolve on a MacBook Air and to my surprise 1) it worked and 2) it exported just as fast as iMovie. I suspect it was using the same Apple provided encoder as iMovie, and that seemed to be confirmed by peeking in Activity Monitor while the programs were running individually.
 
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