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Hackintosh 2022 and beyond - Is there any point now?

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pastrychef

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Hi @pastrychef ,
have you heard of Gigabyte Project Stealth

Linux Tech Tips video on the subject. Don't think it really solves the issues you've raised but it's better that the design we have have currently.

No, I hadn't seen that. While it's a step in the right direction, it seems more like a patchwork to me... I feel that it's time for the entire ATX standard to be changed along with the power delivery to the motherboard and its components.

The way the quad slot video cards block out all the PCI-e slots on an mATX motherboard also makes no sense to me. There has to be a better way. It's time to trash the established standards and come up with something better.
 
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"Standards" aren't always better. Often, it's flawed standards that give rise to proprietary.

Funny way of thinking...

Standards are better when things need to interoperate.

At the time PC layout was ordained, there was a lot of room for electro-physical advances. Well progress marches and all the headroom for improvement has been used up. The $5000 PC is a performance giant with a computational capability exceeding what cost $50,000,000 to deploy to a national lab in 1999.

Tera scale computing went to exa-scale in 25 years. That's a scale factor ranging from 1,000 to 1,000,000. It's difficult to compare because the architectures are so different.

The time has come where sheer physics improvements have slowed down and advancing the architecture is appropriate.

Most notably, what used to be a collection of upgradable PC modules where users had a cost interest in minor upgrades to climb the ladder of change, can now be managed as one replaceable unit, e.g., the NUC or game console.

These more tightly integrated form-factors can be more reliable, and are as cheap as individual peripheral upgrades were to the previous era of IBM AT PC.

When you want to make an architecture change, this disrupts the interdependence of system layers. Vertically integrated products are by their nature be managed to promote the advantages of such change. Horizontally integrated products must deal with disruption.

The PC industry will muddle its way through: it's a much more diverse and richer industry than Apple, but it has lost any masthead brand to help us understand what a PC means as a commodity, while Apple is a mega-brand. This causes the appearance that PCs are lagging, but they're not, it's just becoming unclear to buyers what if anything offers new value.

I think much bigger changes than Apple is making right now are required and possible. But they aren't likely to be made for the same sorts of reasons that no progress in being made on the ecological crisis: it's not in industries general interest to change.

I don't see what "standardization" means as a limit to Intel and Microsift: they can do anything they want, they just want to keep making money the same way as before.

Something that mystifies me about Musk taking over Twitter is how he summarily disposed of a valuable cadre of elite web staff as if they were garbage in order to do debt service on a deal he didn't even want. What a dick. An innovator would have an idea how to repurpose that incredible wealth into a new inflection point for the web. But like most dim-witted captains of industry he just looked at the balance sheet and flipped the switch on the shredder. Dumb beyond all reckoning. Unless maybe he absorbs them into another sector?
 

pastrychef

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We are less than two months away from 2023 and this is still the "standard"...

11-fp_power_sw.jpg


I'd welcome an update, even if it's "proprietary".
 

pastrychef

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Something that mystifies me about Musk taking over Twitter is how he summarily disposed of a valuable cadre of elite web staff as if they were garbage in order to do debt service on a deal he didn't even want. What a dick. An innovator would have an idea how to repurpose that incredible wealth into a new inflection point for the web. But like most dim-witted captains of industry he just looked at the balance sheet and flipped the switch on the shredder. Dumb beyond all reckoning. Unless maybe he absorbs them into another sector?


I've always felt Musk is just a really really good con man.
 
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False. If your computer is exposed to the internet, you’re at risk. We saw this with windows xp for example. Many non corporate machines were affected by worms and other malware and caught into botnets and other bad situations. But it’s your life if you want to use and put your credit card and private information on a machine with an old unsupported OS chock full of vulnerabilities with no support from the vendor, go right ahead. Good luck to you.
There you can read "Apple’s updates provide only selective fixes along with a false sense of security." ;)
 
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There you can read "Apple’s updates provide only selective fixes along with a false sense of security." ;)
True. But at least the more recent OSes are still being updated to some degree. But no OS is 100% secure… as we can see with the existence of zero-days that the vendor knows nothing about until disclosure. My point is, even if someone discloses a zero day for High Sierra for example, Apple is not going to do anything about it…

That being said, I’m going to continue running Monterey for the foreseeable future. I do not like Ventura…Monterey is stable on my Hack. When I put the hack to sleep in Monterey, it stays asleep for days on end until I wake it up. Ventura on the other wakes up intermittently overriding the settings to disable that behavior. And sometimes that process causes a crash. Worse of all, the Ventura kernel disconnects my thunderbolt bus during resume-from-sleep if TB devices are connected to the hack via a TB4 dock. None of this madness happens in Monterey.
 
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Eclectic Light Co. On macOS Support Patterns

It’s safer to delay upgrading

Much as I respect Andrew Cunningham in Ars Technica, I question his conclusion that “most people running an up-to-date Big Sur or Monterey installation with an up-to-date Safari browser should be safe from most high-priority threats, especially if you also keep the other apps on your Mac updated.” Even if security threats were the only concern, this begs the question as to how to tell whether you are among those “most people”, and the only threats you’ll ever encounter are among the “most high-priority threats” that you should be safe from.
It’s a similar argument to that concerning vaccination of younger people against Covid or other generally non-fatal conditions. Most people under the age of 70 who are in reasonably good health should be safe from serious or prolonged illness or death. But the only way to tell whether you are most people is in retrospect.

Mark Josh Long’s words: “macOS Mojave is — and presumably always will be — vulnerable to the “FORCEDENTRY” bug that has been actively exploited by the Pegasus spyware.” What other actively exploited bugs are Big Sur and Monterey now vulnerable to? What bugs remain in their old versions of APFS, Time Machine, or anything else in the system that could result in data loss?

Making these decisions is always a gamble. Although I well understand you might feel more reassured by waiting a couple of weeks to ensure there are no showstoppers that might make upgrading unwise, delaying beyond the first update brings ever-increasing risk. That’s no longer a risk I’m prepared to take: I put my production Mac where my mouth is, and upgraded it to Ventura on the day of its release, followed rapidly by my other Macs.
 
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If you edit in FCPX, Apple Silicon Macs will outperform any hackintosh because of the Media Engines' hardware encoders/decoders.
Resolve Studio Also
SuperScale 3X on 4K media in 2,5 faster with Neural Engine (MacStudio) than CPU (iMac 2019 top of the line)
apple_neural_engine_davinci.webp
 
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