G5 Case Mod - Keeping the case as original as possible

Discussion in 'PowerMac G5' started by melka, Aug 7, 2017.

  1. melka

    melka

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2013
    Messages:
    6
    Mobo:
    Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H
    CPU:
    Core i7 3770k
    Graphics:
    GTX 750Ti OC 2Go
    Mac:
    MacBook
    Classic Mac:
    PowerBook
    Mobile Phone:
    Android
    Aug 7, 2017 at 11:49 PM #1
    melka

    melka

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2013
    Messages:
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    Mobo:
    Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H
    CPU:
    Core i7 3770k
    Graphics:
    GTX 750Ti OC 2Go
    Mac:
    MacBook
    Classic Mac:
    PowerBook
    Mobile Phone:
    Android
    Hi everyone,

    First of all, sorry for my english as it is not my native language.

    Like most of you, I've been a fan of the G5 case design. I started about a year ago to work on my mod, it's not yet completed 100% but it's been running fine for around 10 month now.

    I've been running a hackintosh since 2013, a pretty standard config for the time :
    - Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H
    - Intel Core i7 3770K
    - 16Gb Ram
    - Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo
    - BeQuiet 750W PSU

    Some upgrades I added over the years were SSDs and a better GPU (currently running a GTX 750Ti, but will soon be replaced by a 960 since I can have one really cheap).

    It's an old build, but it's still running great and I rarely feel I should upgrade. Maybe someday when I have cash laying around...

    After seeing all the case mods around the Internet, one thing I was sure I didn't want to do was to cut the case. Instead, I decided I would keep it as original as possible and build some parts to adapt an ATX motherboard to this case.

    I won't bore you with the disassembly pictures we've all seen hundreds of time. Once the case was striped down, it was time to make a simple CAD model of the compartment in order to see how I could fit the mobo. I measured the position and height of the existing motherboard mounts and added them to the CAD file.

    [​IMG]

    I then added a standard ATX motherboard for reference to get a rough idea of where and how it could go.

    [​IMG]

    Next step was to make sure everything would fit, so I went onto grabcad to find 3d models of all the connectors, headers, components, etc... I could find to make my virtual mobo as close as possible as the real one.

    [​IMG]

    And then the components. The person who modeled that GTX 980 : thank you ! I've put this GPU in the CAD project just to have dimensionnal references to a huge graphics card in case I want to upgrade some day.

    [​IMG]

    It was then time to do some real work. I modeled a bunch of plastic parts to be 3D printed. Those part would be screwed to the existing posts on the G5 case and would "deport" the holes to the ATX standard placement.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    For the PSU, I removed the insides of the G5 PSU and transplanted the circuits from my BeQuiet PSU (using small plastic parts as with the mobo). I was able to reuse the original power connector without a problem. I then drilled the PSU case to keep the 120mm fan from the BeQuiet PSU.

    I also made a 2x2.5" tray to go in the original HDD caddy.

    [​IMG]

    I tried wiring the front connectors, I wasn't able to get audio working, and the USB plug was doing weird things. I'm guessing it's a grounding issue since the motherboard is only grounded via the ATX connector, not the screw holes, so I plan on getting a small grounding wire between one screw hole and the chassis.

    I don't have any picture of the case with the components inside, but I'll soon be working on phase 2 : getting the backpanel working. I'll take pictures then.

    Right now, I have wires hanging from slots holes, but I want to reuse the original USB / Audio / Ethernet connectors. I made a PCB in Eagle CAD based on the original G5 motherboard to get the placement right. I then rerouted the connectors to standard 0.254mm pitch headers in order to directly solder cables to them. On the other side of the cable, I'll be using 90° connectors.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Subtle

    Subtle

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    Aug 8, 2017 at 12:52 PM #2
    Subtle

    Subtle

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    This looks very impressive so far. I'm looking forward to seeing some photos of the real thing!
     
  3. macnb

    macnb

    Joined:
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    Mobo:
    GA-Z77X-UP5-TH
    CPU:
    i7-3770K
    Graphics:
    HD4000 (for now)
    Mac:
    iMac, MacBook Pro
    Mobile Phone:
    Android, iOS, Windows Phone
    Aug 10, 2017 at 10:21 AM #3
    macnb

    macnb

    Joined:
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    Mobo:
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    CPU:
    i7-3770K
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    HD4000 (for now)
    Mac:
    iMac, MacBook Pro
    Mobile Phone:
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    Great 3D images and engineering skills.
    Awaiting 3D to real component photos.

    What materials are you planning to use for the standoff and PCI I/O bracket ?
    Have are going to manage air flow through the chassis with he graphics card blocking the flow ?
     
  4. melka

    melka

    Joined:
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    Mobo:
    Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H
    CPU:
    Core i7 3770k
    Graphics:
    GTX 750Ti OC 2Go
    Mac:
    MacBook
    Classic Mac:
    PowerBook
    Mobile Phone:
    Android
    Aug 10, 2017 at 2:34 PM #4
    melka

    melka

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Mobo:
    Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H
    CPU:
    Core i7 3770k
    Graphics:
    GTX 750Ti OC 2Go
    Mac:
    MacBook
    Classic Mac:
    PowerBook
    Mobile Phone:
    Android
    @macnb : I printed the parts in PLA and had no problem. Air flow hasn't been a problem for now, but I'm using a smaller GTX750. I also installed 2 x 92mm BeQuiet fans in the original back fan housing. If the need ever arises, I have a housing for a 140mm fan that can be printed and installed on 2 standoffs that I didn't use to attach the mobo, that would put this fan in front of the mobo and just next to the front grill.
     
  5. melka

    melka

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Mobo:
    Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H
    CPU:
    Core i7 3770k
    Graphics:
    GTX 750Ti OC 2Go
    Mac:
    MacBook
    Classic Mac:
    PowerBook
    Mobile Phone:
    Android
    Aug 16, 2017 at 5:41 PM #5
    melka

    melka

    Joined:
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    Mobo:
    Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H
    CPU:
    Core i7 3770k
    Graphics:
    GTX 750Ti OC 2Go
    Mac:
    MacBook
    Classic Mac:
    PowerBook
    Mobile Phone:
    Android
    So today I went ahead and etched the PCB

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Here it is all cut and drilled, next to the original piece of motheboard

    [​IMG]

    The fit seems pretty good, I haven't soldered it yet and I have to check in the case before going any further, but I'm confident ;)

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  6. melka

    melka

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2013
    Messages:
    6
    Mobo:
    Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H
    CPU:
    Core i7 3770k
    Graphics:
    GTX 750Ti OC 2Go
    Mac:
    MacBook
    Classic Mac:
    PowerBook
    Mobile Phone:
    Android
    Aug 16, 2017 at 6:15 PM #6
    melka

    melka

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2013
    Messages:
    6
    Mobo:
    Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H
    CPU:
    Core i7 3770k
    Graphics:
    GTX 750Ti OC 2Go
    Mac:
    MacBook
    Classic Mac:
    PowerBook
    Mobile Phone:
    Android
    And here it is inside the case, the fit is pretty good despite some misalignment. Some of those can be worked out by wiggling the connector before soldering, but for the airport and bluetooth antennas, I guess my holes were misplaced. Oh well, it will work that way.
    (And sorry for the dusty case guys :/ I haven't cleaned the computer for several months and it's quite dusty here. I'll clean it in the next couple of days, you can be sure).

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    yangbao111 likes this.

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