Botched upgrade, need to edit nvram from USB boot to remove boot-options, please help.

Discussion in 'BIOS/UEFI' started by MacOrDie, Aug 4, 2016.

  1. MacOrDie

    MacOrDie

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    Aug 4, 2016 at 3:30 AM #1
    MacOrDie

    MacOrDie

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    Greetings,

    I did the upgrade last OSX upgrade when I was tired and forgot to remove the nvda_drv=1 from the NVRAM boot-options.

    Unfortunately, I can't boot into single user mode to edit NVRAM since the system panics and reboots before getting to the prompt.

    How can I edit the NVRAM booting from USB?

    I appreciate your help.

    Note and Assumptions: the Clover config.plist is clear of all options, this option is coming from the boot-options in the NVRAM. My assumption was that I would just boot off of USB, mount the old EFI partition, and use clover to edit the NVRAM. Clover only seems to modify the config.plist.
     
  2. kiiroaka

    kiiroaka

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    Aug 4, 2016 at 4:04 AM #2
    kiiroaka

    kiiroaka

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    Get into the Clover UEFI Shell. You should be able to get into the options and reset nvda_drv to 0. When you see your disk drive selected use the right arrow key to go past that, down to the next row, and then you should be able to clear any boot flags.
     
  3. MacOrDie

    MacOrDie

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    Aug 4, 2016 at 4:06 AM #3
    MacOrDie

    MacOrDie

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    OK, I figured it out.. but don't understand, I ran

    nvram boot-arg=""

    when booting from the thumbdrive and it impacted the entire system.

    Where exactly does the nvram live? I assumed it was a file. It is somewhere in the BIOS?

    My system still doesn't boot, back to trouble shooting.
     
  4. vulgo

    vulgo

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    Aug 5, 2016 at 1:54 PM #4
    vulgo

    vulgo

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    In Clover options disable graphics injection, change DSDT path from DSDT.aml to 'none' remove nvda drv param from boot args.

    Back to the boot menu, select os x press space and boot in safe mode.

    Install latest nvidia web drivers

    Open terminal, sudo nvram -c

    Reboot
     
  5. kiiroaka

    kiiroaka

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    Aug 15, 2016 at 5:22 AM #5
    kiiroaka

    kiiroaka

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    NVRAM is the BIOS. The settings in Clover work because it is using EFI, which maps to the BIOS as UEFI settings.

    For instance, today I tried to install Sierra and had no luck. (I couldn't get it to install correctly, so I booted a Linux LiveCD and used GParted to delete the partition and format it to FAT32.) So I installed El Cap instead. After rebooting there was a bootable drive called "Mac OSX". WTHeck? Not that problem again! It had been written to the NVRAM during the install. To remove it I had to boot into Clover UEFI Shell and do a bcfg boot rm command to delete it.
     
    dcouzin likes this.
  6. dcouzin

    dcouzin

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    Feb 10, 2018 at 5:14 AM #6
    dcouzin

    dcouzin

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    hi kiiroaka, I've created a similar problem in my Mac Pro 5,1's NVRAM. A boot option called "OSX Installer", taking up scarce screen space, appears ever since an aborted install. Mac OSX terminal allows command nvram -p to view NVRAM contents. But it seems incomplete. Clearing NVRAM, say with nvram -c, doesn't clear that installer. Would Clover UEFI be better?
     
  7. BreBo

    BreBo Moderator

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    Feb 12, 2018 at 10:34 PM #7
    BreBo

    BreBo Moderator

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    Perhaps you need to remove the hidden installer files.
    See [Guide] How to remove 'Boot OS X install from partition' from Clover bootloader
     
  8. dcouzin

    dcouzin

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    Feb 13, 2018 at 4:08 AM #8
    dcouzin

    dcouzin

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    @BreBo. Thanks for pointing to Thij's guide. I learned from it that the problem resided in an installer folder in a drive partition, rather than in the NVRAM. After much fumbling I found the culprit folder -- .IABootFiles -- in the partition containing the installer app. The now unbloated boot screen feels great, and that "OS X installer" boot had led to kernel panics.

    Thanks also to tonymacx86 for letting me edit a completely wrong earlier version of this post.

    DC
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2018

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